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Values & Tradition


VALUES & TRADITION

Jordan can be regarded for a typically Arab country for its people are very warm, friendly and hospitable. Jordanians are typically happy to forgive foreigners who break the rules of etiquette. However, visitors seen to be making an effort to observe local customs will undoubtedly win favour.

Joining local people for a cup of tea or coffee can be a wonderful way to learn more about local culture. If you are invited yet are unable to attend, then it is perfectly acceptable to decline. Place your right hand over your heart and politely make your excuses.

Many families, particularly in rural areas, are very traditional and, if you visit their house, you may well find it is divided between the men and women. Foreign women are often treated as "honorary" men.

Local women in Jordan enjoy considerable freedom when compared with many other countries in the region. Women are entitled to a full education, they can vote, they can drive cars, and they often play significant roles in business and politics. Arranged marriages and dowries are still common.

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On May 25th 1946, Britain gave up its mandate on Transjordan and Jordan became the independent Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

An economic 'Free Zone' was established in Aqaba in August 2000. It covers one million square metres, although an additional 2.5 million sq. m. has been allocated for the purpose of establishing industrial projects. Goods traded in the Free Zone are exempt of duty. For more information please visit www.aqabazone.com

The city of Aqaba is situated at the most southern part of Jordan and lies on the most northern tip of the Red Sea, on a clear day you can see Israel, Saudi Arabia and Egypt.