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Getting Around

GETTING AROUND

Amman and the surrounding cities are relatively small, and most places of interest - hotels and restaurants - are well-known. Street addresses are rarely used - mail is delivered only to post office boxes located at neighbourhood post office centres, while only the larger street names are commonly known. When giving directions, therefore, people will usually tell you the area or a nearby landmark (a large hotel, ministry building or supermarket, for example) and specific instructions from there. This works more efficiently than it sounds.

Amman itself is built on seven hills, or "jabals," each of which more or less defines a neighbourhood. Many jabals once had a traffic circle (roundabout) at their peak and, although most of the circles have now been replaced by traffic lights, the junctions are still known as 1st Circle, 2nd Circle... 8th Circle. Other Amman neighbourhoods were once separate villages, now swallowed up by the expanding city.

One final word...If you're having trouble finding your way, don't hesitate to ask a passerby, as most people will be delighted to help.


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Some of the world's earliest known churches have been recently discovered in Jordan. The remains of a mud-brick building in Aqaba may be the world's oldest known purpose-built church. This Aqaba early church dates from the late 3rd or early 4th century AD.

An economic 'Free Zone' was established in Aqaba in August 2000. It covers one million square metres, although an additional 2.5 million sq. m. has been allocated for the purpose of establishing industrial projects. Goods traded in the Free Zone are exempt of duty. For more information please visit www.aqabazone.com